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Terrence Sejnowski, the Francis Crick Professor at the Salk Institute of Biological Studies, addresses the uniqueness of the human brain in the "To Be Human" series, sponsored by the Making of the Modern World Program at Eleanor Roosevelt College, UC San Diego.

The biomarkers for many diseases can be found through blood tests, can Alzheimer's disease eventually be diagnosed this way? Douglas R. Galasko, MD joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to discuss the search for these biomarkers and how they might one day lead to earlier and more accurate diagnoses of the disease, improved therapies, clear maps of progression, and much more.

Six in ten people with dementia will wander. Hear about the programs that are available to help bring them home safe. Linda Cho, executive director of Stellar care, joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to discuss the problem of wandering and how to create a home environment that facilitates safety and comfort.

UC San Diego Qualcomm Institute's Larry Smarr, noted authority in information technology and high-performance computing hosts a discussion with UC San Diego's Rob Knight, leading expert on microbiomes and bioinformatics who is widely renowned for his early and innovative investigations of the symbiotic relationships between microbial life and humans, about how the unique cyberinfrastructure resources for Big Data at UC San Diego will drive applications in the new frontier of microbiome research.

Renowned scientist with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography describes how to find areas of agreement between governments, religious leaders and researchers on difficult issues such as the need to address climate change. Recorded on 02/24/2016.

Climate scientist Richard Somerville completes the "Climate Change at the Crossroads" series presented by the UC San Diego Library with a talk recounting his experiences at the Paris COP 21 conference and his ongoing efforts to widen public understanding of the catastrophic impacts of climate change.

The Scripps Research Institute's Dennis Wolan takes you on a fascinating exploration of the human body's ecosystem and the myriad symbiotic relations found there that sustain and affect everything from immunity to behavior, and how his lab "mines" this microbiome for potential therapies.

UC San Diego Associate Professor of Bioengineering Todd Coleman shares his quest to develop health monitoring tattoos that hold promise to revolutionize healthcare and make medicine less invasive. Learn about the potential these technologies have for treating, monitoring, and diagnosing sleep apnea, delirium, GI issues and more.

Mobile devices are an integral part of our daily lives. But with their growing functionality and capability comes increased risk to personal privacy and security. At a fundamental level, mobile devices are incredibly hard to secure. Ben Zhao, Professor of Computer Science at UC Santa Barbara, discusses some of the fundamental security and privacy risks in mobile device and recent work in identifying and addressing the problem of "Sybil Devices," software code that pass themselves as mobile devices to manipulate and attack mobile apps from within. Recorded on 07/12/2016.

Why just read about ancient Rome when you can walk the cobbled streets as if you were really there? That's the promise of virtual reality, augmented reality and mixed reality in today's classrooms. While the idea of strapping on goggles to virtually visit the Colosseum or go inside a molecule sounds like the stuff of science fiction, the technology to do just that is becoming more popular and available every day. Yes, there are plenty of obstacles from cost to teacher training but using virtual reality as an educational tool offers considerable benefits. Not only can it boost visual and technology literacy, but it also improves students' attention and engagement. Learn how this technology has the possibility to transform K-12 education from educators and engineers gathered by UC San Diego. Recorded on 09/13/2017.

Blending climate science with economic modeling, Emilie Mazzacurati offers clients strategic advice on how to protect local communities by integrating climate risk into business decisions. Mazzacurati, an alumna of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, talks with fellow alumnus Jonathan Stein how she founded her company, Four Twenty Seven Climate Solutions, to build climate resilience through social innovation.

Scripps Oceanography's Octavio Aburto examines how Mangroves, trees that form forests in the transition between land and sea, provide an essential habitat for a great diversity of plants and animals and why it is vital to put enormous efforts into understanding the value of mangrove ecosystems. Recorded on 06/12/2017.

"Basic mechanisms in the brain have universal applications and are the road to medical discovery," says Ralph Greenspan, PhD. Learn more as he joins William Mobley MD, PhD to discuss how his work creating dynamic maps of brain activity is shedding light not only on brain function but how we diagnosis and treat neurological diseases. Dr. Greenspan discusses his work with the national BRAIN Initiative, Cal-BRAIN, and discoveries in his lab at UC San Diego.

Seven and a half billion humans are changing the way we relate to the oceans. In this fast-changing world, marine animals and plants must adapt fast to a warmer and corrosive environment as ocean acidification, pollution and deoxygenation continue. This global crisis is causing humans to be anxious about the safety of our oceans for recreation and as a source of food. Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez discusses how humans can contribute to ameliorate current ocean problems and eventually return the oceans to a more sustainable state. Recorded on 07/12/2017.

Patients are frequently given the wrong antibiotics to treat bacterial infections, but it is not the physician who is at fault. The standard antibiotic test used worldwide is flawed since it is based on how well drugs kill bacteria on petri plates not how well they kill bacteria in the body. Mike Mahan describes an "in vivo" antibiotic test that mimics conditions in the body. Drugs that pass the standard test often fail to treat bacterial infections, whereas drugs identified by the test are very effective. Recorded on 07/24/2017.

The Salk Institute's Rusty Gage and University of Washington's Evan Eichler explore the mechanisms and evolutionary pathways that have differentiated human neural development and allowed for the emergence of genes found only in humans. Recorded on 09/29/2017.

The human brain is one of, if not the most important factor that distinguishes our species from all others. Three experts explore the use of stem cells in understanding the primate brain, genes that guided the evolution of the human brain, and the features that enabled the expansion of human neural characteristics. Recorded on 09/29/2017.
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