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Part II of a lecture by Dr. Bob Raabe, Professor Emeritus of plant pathology at UC Berkeley, as he introduces a class of UC Master Gardener students to plant disease diagnosis. Topics include symptoms of poor cultural practices, and fungal and viral infections causing wilting, overgrowths, stunting, and color changes of plants.

Gretchen Hofmann discusses her research in Ocean Global Change Biology in California and Antarctica. In addition to introducing global change biology as a field of study, she highlights her research from ongoing fieldwork in the Santa Barbara Channel. Recorded on 06/29/2015.

Luke Wiseman of the Scripps Research Institute chronicles his experiences and growth as a scientist - from childhood to his present day research in finding potential treatments for diseases caused by faulty regulation of protein folding. Recorded on 10/21/2017.

Given the growing demand for deep sea metals created by electronic and green technologies, scientists are faced with decisions about whether to engage in baseline and impacts research that enables development of a new extraction industry, and whether to contribute expertise to the development of environmental protections and guidelines. Lisa A. Levin, distinguished professor of biological oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, addresses the ethical and societal challenges of exploitation in a relatively unknown realm.

Andy Kieatiwong shares his journey from student to CEO. As the founder and CEO of the Additive Rocket Corporation, he leads a team that leverages 3D metal printing to create reliable and affordable propulsion solutions for space exploration. He speaks with a group of high school seniors about the field of aerospace engineering as well as how to leverage your college experience to find your ideal career. Recorded on 04/15/2017.

Dr. Gurpreet Dhaliwal is a Professor of Medicine at UCSF and is generally considered one of the most skillful diagnosticians in the United States. He teaches medical students and residents in the ER, inpatient wards and outpatient clinic at the San Francisco VA Medical Center. He studies how doctors think, how they diagnose, how they make treatment decisions and how they develop expertise. He has published over ninety articles in leading medical journals including the New England Journal of Medicine and JAMA. Dr. Dhaliwal writes for The Wall Street Journal's "The Experts" series, and, in 2012, he was profiled in The New York Times.

Before we learned to make antimicrobial medicines and vaccines, before we had disinfectants and chemotherapies, we had interferons to thank for protection from viral infections. UC Santa Barbara Distinguished Professor Charles Samuel, an internationally recognized pioneer and leader in the study of interferons, explores why they remain a critical and significant field of research, especially in an age of powerful and constantly evolving viruses that spread rapidly. Recorded on 10/05/2017.

A panel discussion follows the release of the US postage stamp honoring Sally Ride, America's first woman in space. Three trailblazing women leaders Billie Jean King, tennis legend and champion of social change; Ellen Ochoa, first Hispanic woman in space and director of the Johnson Space Center; and Condoleezza Rice, 66th U.S. Secretary of State join journalist Lynn Sherr in sharing stories of obstacles and triumphs while encouraging more women to assume leadership roles in their fields. Presented by Sally Ride Science@UC San Diego.

High energy, long life, rechargeable batteries are considered an important technological opportunity to reduce production of greenhouse gases. What standards should be set for safety of new energy storage technologies? And who should enforce those standards? Learn about these exciting developments as well as how best to meet potential social and ethical challenges from Ying Shirley Meng, Ph.D., Associate Professor Department of Nano Engineering University of California, San Diego.

Cosmologist and author of "Losing the Nobel Prize" Brian Keating tells the inside story of BICEP2's mesmerizing discovery and the scientific drama that ensued in this interview with science fiction author David Brin. Keating describes a journey of revelation and discovery, bringing to life the highly competitive, take-no-prisoners, publish-or-perish world of modern science. Along the way, he provocatively argues that the Nobel Prize, instead of advancing scientific progress, may actually hamper it, encouraging speed and greed while punishing collaboration and bold innovation. In a thoughtful reappraisal of the wishes of Alfred Nobel, Keating offers practical solutions for reforming the prize, providing a vision of a scientific future in which cosmologists may, finally, be able to see all the way back to the very beginning. Recorded on 04/25/2018.

How often do you wonder about supercomputers and computers that "think" like humans? Supercomputers have been used to model complex scientific phenomena for decades. Now, scientists are entering a new era in computing, and computers are learning in a way that is similar to the human brain. With enough information, computers can learn to solve problems in novel and interesting ways. Specialized computers can even solve these problems using significantly less energy than "classical" computers. This talk describes using supercomputers to solve challenging problems and the evolving technologies of learning systems.

An overview the collaborative work of a coral reef ecologist and a cell biologist in their quest to understand the effects of global climate change on coral biology. By combining biomedical laboratory techniques and fieldwork, they are attempting to understand the cellular mechanisms that are disrupted during bleaching, eutrophication, and ocean acidification, and the implications for coral reef ecosystems. Recorded on 04/09/2018.

Industrial farming methods have unpleasant side effects. Is there another way of producing meat? Scientists in several countries are now cultivating meat in laboratories. It could hit supermarket shelves within a few years.
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