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Most people think that in the United States, the area around the San Andreas Fault poses the highest risk for a large earthquake. But the risk for a "great earthquake" and tsunami is highest in the Pacific Northwest. Join seismologist Diego Melgar and learn about the risks, the geologic forces behind the potential for a truly massive U.S. earthquake, and efforts underway to build warning systems for the western U.S.

Innovative computer science faculty create online courses that draw massive enrollments, ensuring the productivity and sustainability of modern agriculture, a new tool to deepen understanding of earthquakes, and a very smart puppy, all on this edition of On Beyond.

Taught by successful educational entrepreneur and UC San Diego Computer Science and Engineering Alumna Sarah Guthals, an innovative new course for computer science students builds the skills necessary to communicate their field to others through the experience of teaching K-12 students the fundamentals of coding in extracurricular settings in schools and libraries.

Scripps Institution's Neal Driscoll provides an inside look at the AlertSoCal system, developed in collaboration with the Scripps-based High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network (HPWREN) and the Nevada Seismological Laboratory, which expands Southern California's state-of-the-art earthquake and weather monitoring system to better detect fires in real time before they spread. Recorded on 02/12/2018.

Cosmologist and author of "Losing the Nobel Prize" Brian Keating tells the inside story of BICEP2's mesmerizing discovery and the scientific drama that ensued in this interview with science fiction author David Brin. Keating describes a journey of revelation and discovery, bringing to life the highly competitive, take-no-prisoners, publish-or-perish world of modern science. Along the way, he provocatively argues that the Nobel Prize, instead of advancing scientific progress, may actually hamper it, encouraging speed and greed while punishing collaboration and bold innovation. In a thoughtful reappraisal of the wishes of Alfred Nobel, Keating offers practical solutions for reforming the prize, providing a vision of a scientific future in which cosmologists may, finally, be able to see all the way back to the very beginning. Recorded on 04/25/2018.

Beth Shapiro, Professor of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology at UC Santa Cruz, explains her work on using ancient DNA to infer evolutionary history and processes. She is the MacArthur Award-winning author of "How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction," which considers the feasibility and desirability of bringing back passenger pigeons, steppe bison, mammoth and other currently extinct species. This program is presented by the Institute for Practical Ethics in the Division of Arts and Humanities at UC San Diego.

Alysson Muotri of UC San Diego's Stem Cell Program discusses his work creating cortical organoids from modern humans and Neanderthal to compare the brains of humans and human predecessors. Recorded on 06/01/2018.

This symposium addresses the interactive gene-culture co-evolution of the human brain with tool use and technology - ranging from simple stone tools millions of years ago to computers today. Dorothy Fragaszy, University of Georgia, compares tool use in nonhuman primates and humans which leads to ideas about the attributes of humans that have led us to differ so dramatically from other primates in technical prowess and technical traditions. Recorded on 10/12/2018.

The Arctic is changing rapidly in response to changes in global climate and economic activity and yet much of it remains unexplored with modern scientific techniques. Jeff Bowman describes his group's work in the Arctic as they seek to understand the ecological implications of changing sea ice conditions, and prepare to participate in the MOSAiC expedition; an unprecedented multi-national effort to study the high Arctic across a complete seasonal cycle.

Professor at Yale University and the founding director of the Yale Stem Cell Center Haifan Lin talks about how the discoveries of small non-coding RNAs, including PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), have significantly expanded the RNA world.

Alysson Muotri and Catriona Jamieson discuss how cutting-edge stem-cell-based cures will reach patients through California's network of Alpha Clinics.

Blockchain technology is set to revolutionize the web - but how does it work? Also: China and its planned social credit system. A biohacker and his digital implants. And, myths and facts about ignorance, intelligence and brain power.

The science of stem cells and how they impact your health.

Khalid Shah, MS, PhD discusses translating biological therapies into clinical care.

This CARTA symposium focuses on the contributions of scientists and scholars of anthropogeny who live and work in Africa. Himla Soodyall discusses links between the historical and genetic narrative of populations in southern Africa. Berhane Asfaw assesses the claims for the "earliest" homo sapians.
Recorded on 05/31/2019.

This CARTA symposium focuses on the contributions of scientists and scholars of anthropogeny who live and work in Africa. This episode: Job Kibii, National Museums of Kenya, on Australopithecus in East and South Africa; Likius Andossa, University of NDjamena, on The Chad Basin; Yonas Beyene, Association for Research and Conservation of Culture, on The Archaeology of Konso-Gardula.
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