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The Scripps Research Institutes' Ryan Shenvi, who searches for ways to synthesize new medicines from both synthetic and natural sources, explores the crucial roles of imagination and critical thinking in the practice of the scientific method.

Choosing residential care for a loved one if often a difficult decision. Linda Cho, executive director of Stellar care, joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to talk about the new models of residential care, family involvement, care with dignity and more.

UCSB's Joseph Polchinski speaks about the search for a unified theory of the laws of physics, and the difficulty of reconciling two of the main pieces: quantum mechanics, which governs the very small, and general relativity, which governs the very large. A professor of physics and a permanent member of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Polchinski was named UC Santa Barbara's 2014 Faculty Research Lecturer. Recorded on 12.04.2014.

Charles Nunn (Duke Univ) identifies selective pressures in this talk that may play a role in favoring shorter sleep in humans, and considers the consequences of these evolutionary changes for understanding human sleep disorders, health across the lifespan, and health disparities. Recorded on 10/14/2016.

Rosina Bierbaum, formerly of President Obama's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) and an Adaptation Fellow at the World Bank shows how climate change will affect all regions and sectors of the economy, and disproportionately affect the poorest people on the planet. Therefore, improving the resilience, adaptation, and preparedness of communities must be a high priority, equal to that of achieving deep greenhouse gas reductions,and rapid development and deployment of innovative technologies, as well as altered planning and management strategies, will be needed in the coming decades to achieve a sustainable world. Recorded on 05/08/2017.

In his role as a Scripps Oceanography shark research biologist, Daniel Cartamil has traveled the Pacific coast of Baja California for over a decade. He discovered a fragile paradise of remote landscapes, wildlife, and cultural treasures, on the verge of being overtaken by modern civilization. Science and art converge as we take a photographic journey through western Baja California illustrated with breathtaking photography from Cartamil's new book, "Baja's Wild Side." Recorded on 07/11/2017.

Engineers are often tasked with building the physical infrastructure capable of serving the underlying societal demands. Examples include transportation networks, power grids, data centers, and many more. A fundamental challenge associated with these "socio-technical" systems is that their underlying performance is largely impacted by how society chooses to use them, and unfortunately society tends to use such systems in a highly inefficient way. Jason Marden sheds some light on the unique challenges that surface when seeking to design and control such systems. Recorded on 06/28/2017.

Patients are frequently given the wrong antibiotics to treat bacterial infections, but it is not the physician who is at fault. The standard antibiotic test used worldwide is flawed since it is based on how well drugs kill bacteria on petri plates not how well they kill bacteria in the body. Mike Mahan describes an "in vivo" antibiotic test that mimics conditions in the body. Drugs that pass the standard test often fail to treat bacterial infections, whereas drugs identified by the test are very effective. Recorded on 07/24/2017.

This presentation provides a cellular and molecular analysis of comparative neural development in closely related hominids, which opens new avenues for understanding the differences in the neural underpinnings of cognition and neurological disease susceptibility between species. Recorded on 09/29/2017.

Just ten years ago, questions about editing genomes of the next human generation were largely hypothetical. The prospect of erasing fatal or debilitating diseases was seen as a goal worth pursuing, even as some worried about the slippery slope of using this technology to create "designer babies." Since then, the science has progressed rapidly. We now have a variety of tools that move these possibilities from theoretical to plausible. Based on his own research, as well as knowledge of the findings of others conducting stem cell research, Evan Y. Snyder, MD, PhD, FAAP will describe some of these tools and lead a discussion addressing key questions such as: Do we want to do this at all? If we are editing human genomes, then should this be done in vitro, in utero, or after birth? Are there some things we should not do? Who decides?

Plants have evolved the capability to convert atmospheric CO2 into biopolymers and therefore represent distributed systems for carbon removal that are highly scalable. Can we harness the power of plants today to help mitigate climate change? Wolfgang Busch, Ph.D., Associate Professor Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory, Salk Institute, explains the possibilities.

State-of-the-art imaging at the molecular, cellular, circuit, and whole animal scales in rodents and primates are discussed in this symposium, while addressing the challenges of bridging spatial and temporal scales.

State-of-the-art imaging at the molecular, cellular, circuit, and whole animal scales in rodents and primates are discussed in this symposium, while addressing the challenges of bridging spatial and temporal scales.
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