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Calit Research Scientist and National Geographic Explorer Albert Lin, renowned for his hi-tech search for the tomb of Genghis Khan hosts Ryan Kastner, co-director of UC San Diego's Engineers for Exploration Program in a discussion of the ways computer engineering and computer science are integral to many fields like archaeology that one would never imagine.

Using the web and mobile devices, we now have comprehensive maps of the great outdoors, our planet and its mountains, plains and oceans. But what about the places where GPS does not work, such as underground, in buildings and megastructures, under dense tree canopies, on board ships or inside aircraft? Research cartographer Keith Clarke is working toward mapping the great indoors using new technologies. See what that entails and what it enables. Recorded on 07/21/2016.

Michael Green, neuroscientist and professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at UCLA, has been fascinated with the human brain, behavior and mental illness since his undergraduate days. In particular, his research focuses on schizophrenia, a chronic brain disorder that affects about 1 percent of the population. In this UCLA Faculty Research Lecture, he describes how his lab uses discoveries in psychology and social neuroscience about normal brain functioning to inform his schizophrenia research. And now, Green and his colleagues are moving into new territory, studying the causes of social isolation among people who do not have schizophrenia. You'll learn about the tools they use such as functional MRI, that measures and maps brain activity, and EEG, that detects electrical activity in the brain, and how they do research to answer questions about social isolation in the general public. Recorded on 11.06.2017.

Meet Paul Martini, the "iboss". As CEO of iboss Paul's goal is meeting the challenge of safeguarding data in the exponentially expanding universe of bandwidth used in cyberspace. Growing up in the tough heart of Los Angeles, this son of immigrants shares about the influences, experiences, and people that shaped him on his path to success.

The Scripps Research Institute's Katja Lamia gives a brief perspective on the history of circadian clock research and introduces current ideas about how circadian disruption increases the risks of cancer and metabolic diseases. Recorded on 02/10/2018.

Taught by successful educational entrepreneur and UC San Diego Computer Science and Engineering Alumna Sarah Guthals, an innovative new course for computer science students builds the skills necessary to communicate their field to others through the experience of teaching K-12 students the fundamentals of coding in extracurricular settings in schools and libraries.

State-of-the-art imaging at the molecular, cellular, circuit, and whole animal scales in rodents and primates are discussed in this symposium, while addressing the challenges of bridging spatial and temporal scales.

Cosmologist and author of "Losing the Nobel Prize" Brian Keating tells the inside story of BICEP2's mesmerizing discovery and the scientific drama that ensued in this interview with science fiction author David Brin. Keating describes a journey of revelation and discovery, bringing to life the highly competitive, take-no-prisoners, publish-or-perish world of modern science. Along the way, he provocatively argues that the Nobel Prize, instead of advancing scientific progress, may actually hamper it, encouraging speed and greed while punishing collaboration and bold innovation. In a thoughtful reappraisal of the wishes of Alfred Nobel, Keating offers practical solutions for reforming the prize, providing a vision of a scientific future in which cosmologists may, finally, be able to see all the way back to the very beginning. Recorded on 04/25/2018.

Beth Shapiro, Professor of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology at UC Santa Cruz, explains her work on using ancient DNA to infer evolutionary history and processes. She is the MacArthur Award-winning author of "How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction," which considers the feasibility and desirability of bringing back passenger pigeons, steppe bison, mammoth and other currently extinct species. This program is presented by the Institute for Practical Ethics in the Division of Arts and Humanities at UC San Diego.

Brian Nosek, co-founder and executive director of the Center for Open Science, outlines the most urgent challenges in achieving a more open science future and how the scholarly communication community can change practices to validate and recognize open research. Nosek, a professor of psychology at the University of Virginia, is presented by the UC San Diego Library. Recorded on 04.19.2018.

The bicycle of the future features an onboard computer with touchscreen, electronic gears, and an anti-theft device activated via phone app. Plus: Breast cancer and genetic mutations, exercising your genes and new helmets to improve cycling safety.

Hunting is considered a key human adaptation and is thought to have influenced our anatomy, physiology and behavior over time. This symposium explores the evidence pertaining to the origins of hominin hunting.

Hunting is considered a key human adaptation and is thought to have influenced our anatomy, physiology and behavior over time. This symposium explores the evidence pertaining to the origins of hominin hunting.
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