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Poet Nikki Giovanni reads a selection of her poems as part of the 2016 Writer's Symposium by the Sea at Point Loma Nazarene University.

In his highly-acclaimed book, The Nazis Next Door, Eric Lichtblau tells the shocking and shameful story of how America became a safe haven for Hitler's men. Lichtblau explains here how it was possible for thousands of Nazis -- from concentration camp guards to high-level officers in the Third Reich -- to move to the U.S. after WWII, and quietly settle into new lives as Americans. Some of them gained entry as self-styled refugees, while others enjoyed the help and protection of the CIA, the FBI, and the military, who put them to work as spies, intelligence assets, and leading scientists and engineers. Lichtblau's book draws from once-secret government records and interviews, telling the full story of the Nazi scientists brought to America, and the German spies and con men who followed them and lived for decades as Americans. He is presented by the Holocaust Living History Workshop at UC San Diego.

Gisela Striker shows how the Stoic philosopher Panaetius, on whose work Cicero based his own treatise, actually presented what might be seen as a complete version of Stoic ethics without the theological and cosmological elements for which Cicero and other Stoics are sometimes criticized. Striker is Professor of Philosophy and of the Classics, Emerita, at Harvard University. Recorded on 04/12/2017.

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989, becoming the first Nobel laureate to be recognized for his concern for global environmental problems. He addressed an audience at UC San Diego focusing on love and kindness among humanity. He urged compassion and sharing each other's problems as one human family to overcome the distance and violence in the world. Recorded on 06/17/2017.

One of the most important composers in jazz history, Charles Mingus documented his lively impressions of Tijuana in "Tijuana Moods," a rarely performed suite. Join grammy-winning jazz author Ashley Kahn; eminent alto saxophonist Charles McPherson, a longstanding member of Charles Mingus' band; Anthony Davis, UC San Diego professor of music and noted composer, pianist and improviser; and Steven Schick, UC San Diego professor of music, percussionist, and conductor, for an exploration of the legacy of African-American composer Charles Mingus and his historic Tijuana Moods album. Recorded on 01/20/2018.

Just ten years ago, questions about editing genomes of the next human generation were largely hypothetical. The prospect of erasing fatal or debilitating diseases was seen as a goal worth pursuing, even as some worried about the slippery slope of using this technology to create "designer babies." Since then, the science has progressed rapidly. We now have a variety of tools that move these possibilities from theoretical to plausible. Based on his own research, as well as knowledge of the findings of others conducting stem cell research, Evan Y. Snyder, MD, PhD, FAAP will describe some of these tools and lead a discussion addressing key questions such as: Do we want to do this at all? If we are editing human genomes, then should this be done in vitro, in utero, or after birth? Are there some things we should not do? Who decides?

Plants have evolved the capability to convert atmospheric CO2 into biopolymers and therefore represent distributed systems for carbon removal that are highly scalable. Can we harness the power of plants today to help mitigate climate change? Wolfgang Busch, Ph.D., Associate Professor Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory, Salk Institute, explains the possibilities.

A legendary director noted for his uncompromising passion, Werner Herzog joins Carsey-Wolf Center Director Patrice Petro for a discussion about his 1979 film "Nosferatu The Vampyre" which he says is a tribute to the classic 1922 film "Nosferatu" by F.W. Murnau. Herzog also discusses his career and the film's significance as a bridge to the masterworks of interwar cinema. Recorded on 10/12/2017.

Celebrate the launch of the Women Waging Peace Network at the Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice at the University of San Diego as emcee and US Ambassador Swanee Hunt leads a panel of peacemakers marking the success of the more than 1,000 women from around the world who have joined together to serve as negotiators, experts, advocates, policy makers, and other roles crucially needed in peace processes. The Women Waging Peace Network was founded by Ambassador Hunt and developed into a preeminent global network of women leaders by Hunt Alternatives and the Institute for Inclusive Security.

Lisa Bruce has made feature films both domestic and internationally, both independently and with major studios. She was a producer on "Darkest Hour," a film starring Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill that follows his early days as Prime Minister while Hitler closes in on Britain during World War II. She is joined in conversation with Matt Ryan at the Pollock Theater at UC Santa Barbara. Recorded on 11/01/2017.

Sonia Kennebeck, producer and director of "National Bird," talks with UCSB PhD candidate in the Department of Film and Media Studies Daniel Grinberg about her documentary on the US drone program told through the eyes of three military veterans and survivors. Kennebeck is an independent documentary filmmaker and investigative journalist with more than 15 years of directing and producing experience. Recorded on 11/14/2017.

Billy Wilder's "Some Like it Hot" is one of the great comedies of Hollywood's golden age. Wilder was an Austrian-America filmmaker who moved to Paris then Hollywood after the rise of the Nazi party. David Mandel (Veep, Seinfeld) joins Carsey-Wolf Center Director Patrice Petro to discuss the film that starred Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon posing as women after witnessing a mob massacre in Chicago. Recorded on 11/19/2017.

In "Confronting Political Intimidation and Public Bullying: A Citizen's Handbook for the Trump Era and Beyond," author and Literature professor emeritus Roddey Reid traces the origins of the current toxic environment back some 30 years to a culture of abuse in the workplace, media and the political arena. In conversation with sociologist Akos Rona-Tas, Reid reviews the strategies and dynamics of contemporary bullying: how it works, the danger it causes, and the lessons to be learned in pursuit of a more civil public life. Reid is presented by the Division of Social Sciences, the Division of Arts and Humanities along with the Program in Jewish Studies and the Department of Literature at UC San Diego.

Author and Boston University law professor Pnina Lahav discusses her forthcoming biography, "Golda Meir: Through the Gender Lens." She explores the first and only woman prime minister of Israel, and her complex relationship with her role as a female leader in a man's world. During the course of her legal career, Pnina Lahav has published nearly 50 journal articles and three books, including the critically acclaimed 'Judgement in Jerusalem: Chief Justice Simon Agranat and the Zionist Century'. Recorded on 11/12/2017.
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