Health and Medicine


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In the United States, privacy is considered a fundamental right. Yet today our activities are followed to a degree unfathomable not long ago by way of cell phones, online behaviors, and more. As genomic technologies continue to expand, another avenue now exists by which we may potentially be scrutinized: DNA sequence. Our genetic information contains our most private details, but we leave it everywhere and share the sequence closely with dozens or even hundreds of relatives. Laura Rivard, PhD, professor of biology at the University of San Diego, discusses ways in which our DNA may "escape" from our control, what can actually be done with the sequence, and whether there is cause for concern.

Bones are dynamic and continue to rebuild themselves, even as we age. Bone remodeling is supported by a healthy diet and by regular physical activity. Join Vicky Newman, MS, RDN to learn more about dietary choices that help calcium stay in our bones and out of our blood vessels to support both bone strength and arterial flexibility. Adequate calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K, and several trace minerals are all important, as is enough protein and alkaline minerals like magnesium. Our food, supplement, and activity choices help protect bone strength and structural flexibility to help prevent injury and speed healing.

Dr. Lisa Chamberlain is known for her work in pediatric health inequities, focusing on the non-clinical factors that contribute to health disparities, particularly in California. She is nationally known for her work in community pediatrics and child health advocacy. Recorded on 02/21/2020.

Over the past two decades novel coronaviruses have spilled from the bat to the human population on three occasions. The first two breakouts in south China in 2003 and in Saudi Arabia in 2012 launched the SARS and MERS outbreaks, respectively. Both outbreaks were contained by aggressive case finding, contact tracing and quarantine activities. A third crossover of a novel coronavirus into the human population occurred in the fall of 2019. This event which is believed to have occurred around a wet market in Wuhan, China was unfortunately not efficiently contained and spread rapidly across China. Since its crossover events six months ago, the virus has infected over 4 million people and resulted in 300,000 deaths. This presentation by Dr. Chip Schooley, UC San Diego Professor of Medicine, focuses on the biology, pathogenesis and epidemiology of the SARS-2 coronavirus and containment efforts to date.


Infectious diseases have profound influences on the evolution of their host populations. In the case of humans, the host species has also shaped pathogen dynamics and virulence via a multitude of factors from changes in social organization, group size, and exploitation of varied habitats and their animals and plant resources to agriculture, technology, rapid long-distance travel, medicine and global economic integration - which all continue to shape epidemics and the human host populations. This symposium will explore how infectious agents and humans have shaped each other over the eons.

Infectious diseases have profound influences on the evolution of their host populations. In the case of humans, the host species has also shaped pathogen dynamics and virulence via a multitude of factors from changes in social organization, group size, and exploitation of varied habitats and their animals and plant resources to agriculture, technology, rapid long-distance travel, medicine and global economic integration - which all continue to shape epidemics and the human host populations. This symposium will explore how infectious agents and humans have shaped each other over the eons.

Our climate is changing and the world is warming. Our health and wellbeing will be impacted. What does this have to do with skin? As out first line of defense we rely on our skin to be a barrier and protector. Dr. Mary Williams, Clinical Professor of Dermatology at UCSF, looks a the effects of air pollution and climate change on the skin.
Recorded on 05/12/2020.

The US has lagged behind other countries in testing for COVID-19. Dr. Chaz Langelier, UCSF Infectious Disease experts, talks about why we were late to start testing and the importance of widespread testing for a disease that spreads through asymptotic or pre-symptomatic individuals. He also talks about lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), the leading cause of death due to infection. Currently, the cause of most LRTI remains unknown due to limitations of current tests. Recorded on 05/27/2020.

Stephen Hedrick, a leader in immunology research, takes us through an introduction of epidemiology as a whole, the theory underlying pandemics, and what we can expect based on what we've experienced in the past. Particularly relevant today, we'll learn if COVID-19 will ever go away, why we need a vaccine and what will happen if we don't obtain one based on history. Learn how science can help us prevent and prepare for the next outbreak.

Join UC San Diego Vice Chancellor David Brenner, MD and the Cardiovascular Institutes Co-Executive Directors Drs. Michael Madani and Ehtisham Mahmud, for a conversation about how COVID-19 can impact heart healthand how UC San Diego Health is at the forefront of providing care for whatever challenges COVID-19 may present. Recorded on 05/19/2020.

In this presentation from the course The Evolution of Infectious Diseases, professor of biology and infectious disease researcher Justin Meyer provides a detailed overview of the previous, current and future evolution of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
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