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The paradox of today's global food system is that food insecurity or obesity threaten the health and welfare of half the world's population. Underlying these problems is an overabundant and overly competitive food system in which companies are forced to expand market channels to meet corporate growth targets. The contradiction between the goals of public health and food corporations has led to a large and growing food movement in the United States, which seeks policy changes to promote healthier and more environmentally sound food choices. Marion Nestle considers the cultural, economic, and institutional factors that influence food policies and choices, and the balance between individual and societal responsibility for those choices. Recorded on 03/21/2017.

Treating depression can be a slow process. Even after pinpointing the correct medication, it can still take weeks to take effect. Abraham A. Palmer, PhD, Professor and Vice Chair for Basic Research in the Department of Psychiatry at UC San Diego joins our host Dr. David Granet to discuss his work uncovering of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of depression. Dr. Palmer and his team are exploring how inhibiting the Glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) enzyme can reduce signs of depression. He explains the science behind the discovery and the implications for new, faster-acting treatments.

Starting with a fascinating history of diving, Dr. Stephen Hoffman explores various causes, effects, and symptoms of diving accidents and complications. Recorded on 05/10/2017.

Michael Green, neuroscientist and professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at UCLA, has been fascinated with the human brain, behavior and mental illness since his undergraduate days. In particular, his research focuses on schizophrenia, a chronic brain disorder that affects about 1 percent of the population. In this UCLA Faculty Research Lecture, he describes how his lab uses discoveries in psychology and social neuroscience about normal brain functioning to inform his schizophrenia research. And now, Green and his colleagues are moving into new territory, studying the causes of social isolation among people who do not have schizophrenia. You'll learn about the tools they use such as functional MRI, that measures and maps brain activity, and EEG, that detects electrical activity in the brain, and how they do research to answer questions about social isolation in the general public. Recorded on 11.06.2017.

Clinical psychologist Erik Groessl talks about research showing the value of yoga in reducing pain, improving physical function and overcoming opioid addiction in military veterans, among other patients, in this conversation with Paul J. Mills of UC San Diego.

In discussing his new book, "Dirt is Good: The Advantage of Germs For Your Child's Developing Immune System," author and UC San Diego Professor of Pediatrics and Computer Science & Engineering Rob Knight explains how the microbiome works and offers guidance for parents on boosting their children's health. Knight is presented by the Library Channel at UC San Diego. Recorded on 10/24/2017.

Dr. Paul Volberding, professor of medicine at UCSF, was perhaps the leading clinician in the United States in the early days of the HIV epidemic. As a young oncologist finishing his training in the early 1980's, Volberding recalls seeing a young gay man with a previously rare tumor: Kaposi's sarcoma. Little did he know that the underlying immunodeficiency that led to KS would come to define his career. Volberding went on to become the founding chief of the AIDS division at San Francisco General Hospital, where he established the first inpatient AIDS wards and outpatient AIDS clinic. In this interview with Dr. Bob Wachter, chair of UCSF's Department of Medicine, Volberding recalls the early days, including the impact of activism and the fear that he and other clinicians would contract the illness. He also discusses the remarkable progress in turning HIV into a manageable chronic disease and the possibility of finding a cure for AIDS.

Exposure to trauma including abuse, neglect, discrimination, and violence increases an individual's risk for serious health issues. Dr. Leigh Kimberg, Program Director for PRIME-US for students committed to working with urban undeserved communities, discusses the treatment framework that involves understanding, recognizing and responding to effects of all types of trauma in patient care. Recorded on 12/05/2017.

UCSF's medical school designed a curriculum that educates 21st century graduates to deliver measurably excellent health care and advance science while maximizing learning and wellbeing for students and faculty. The UCSF Bridges Curriculum - which launched in August 2016 - is a three-phase, fully integrated curriculum delivered over four years.

Even after medical school, learning for doctors continues in the form of residency, fellowship and lifelong learning. Dr. Robert Baron, Associate Dean for Graduate and Continuing Medical Education at UCSF, explains how doctors become specialists and then stay current throughout their careers. Recorded on 11/29/2017.

Learn more about PRIME-US, a program to nurture, support and equip medical students to become leaders in underserved care. This is a five year supplementary curricular tract at UCSF School of Medicine and the UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program. Recorded on 12/06/2017.

The Last Gift study aims to understand where and how HIV hides in the human body when a person with HIV is taking HIV medications. The Last Gift study tackles these aims by studying people with HIV who are terminally ill from a disease other than HIV, like cancer, ALS, or heart disease. The study follows these volunteers with regular blood draws before the person dies and then examines multiple tissues throughout their bodies after death. From these samples, investigators hope to understand how HIV remains hidden from both the person's immune system and from current HIV therapy. Results from these studies are designed to help develop ways to clear these reservoirs with future therapies. Dr. Davey Smith, Professor of Medicine and Chief of Infectious Diseases and Global Public Health at UCSD discusses the study and its medical and ethical implications.

When hip pain becomes chronic and intense, hip replacement surgery can offer much-needed relief. In Good Shape talks to a surgeon about knowing when an operation is necessary, how long the healing process takes and what artificial joints are capable of. And we find out: how reliable are iris diagnoses? Plus, PCOS is one of the most common causes of fertility problems. What can be done about it?
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