Arts and Music


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The La Jolla Symphony presents the North American premiere of Philip Glass' Cello Concerto. In addition to the dynamic performance, this program features comments from renowned cellist Wendy Sutter, conductor Steven Schick, and the composer himself.

UC San Diego Professor of Literature and pianist Steven Cassedy presents a psychoacoustic account of dissonant music and a history from the tonal Chopin to the atonal works of Schoenberg, Stravinsky, and Copland in the fourth session of the "To Be Musical" series, sponsored by Eleanor Roosevelt College at UC San Diego.

Filmmaker Iva Radivojevic joins Professors Bhaskar Sarkar and Laila Shereen Sakr of the Department of Film and Media Studies at UCSB for a discussion about her poetic documentary Evaporating Borders that examines the ongoing refugee crisis in Europe. Recorded on 12/01/2015.

La Jolla Music Society's SummerFest celebrates the conclusion of its 30th season with a concert featuring some of the world's best musicians performing as the SummerFest Chamber Orchestra. Led by conductor James Conlon, the Orchestra performs Schubert's "Symphony No. 5," Prokofiev's "Violin Concerto No. 2" (featuring soloist Gil Shaham), and Mozart's "Symphony No. 34."

San Diego Opera General Director David Bennett hosts beloved opera legend Frederica von Stade in a lively discussion about her career, and in particular her long-standing collaboration with composer Jake Heggie (Dead Man Walking, Moby-Dick. In addition to performing Heggie's songs, Von Stade starred in his operas Three Decembers and Great Scott.

Conductor Steven Schick and the La Jolla Symphony & Chorus perform music composed in mid-life, a time when the exuberance of youth begins to transform into the reflections and measured responses of mature adulthood. Each of the three composers represented managed to retain some of that youthful vitality, though expressed within the kind of disciplined structure and mastery of craft that results from experience. Recorded on 2/12/2007.

For more than a half century, John Lithgow has been delighting audiences on stage, in movies and on television. In a lively discussion with Peter Gourevitch, distinguished Professor Emeritus of Political Science at UC San Diego, Lithgow reflects on his preparations for the wide diversity of roles that have shaped his career and influenced the larger culture, from his star turn in "The World According to Garp" to his SAG-award-winning role as Winston Churchill in the Netflix original series "The Crown." Recorded on 10/11/2017.

As suggested by the title, a divertimento was intended as light, relaxed music, a diversion for the audience. This description can't begin to do justice to Mozart's "Divertimento in E-flat Major," an expansive string trio widely considered one of Mozart's greatest chamber works. While "Divertimento" has the jaunty passages we associate with the composer, at times the mood is serious indeed, and the overall quality is somewhat bittersweet. As always, Mozart handles the simple structure of the sonata form with great sophistication. Recorded on 11/22/2017.

UC San Diego's Geisel Library hosts an annual Paper Theater Festival, celebrating an art form with roots in Victorian Era Europe. Paper theaters (also known as toy theaters) were used to promote productions. They were printed on paperboard sheets and sold as kits at the concession stand of an opera house, playhouse, or vaudeville theater. The kits were then assembled at home and plays performed for family members and guests, sometimes with live musical accompaniment. The theaters gradually declined in popularity during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, but have enjoyed a resurgence in interest in recent years among many puppeteers, filmmakers, theater historians, and hobbyists. Presently there are numerous international paper theater festivals throughout the Americas and Europe, as well as several museums.

The Young People's Concert is a fun and informative "family-friendly" introduction to the symphony. Host/Conductor Steven Schick and the orchestra perform annotated excerpts from the 2018 season-opening concert, including Tan Dun's striking "Concerto for Water Percussion and Orchestra" and Igor Stravinsky's beloved ballet "Petrushka." The program features an audience Q&A in addition to the Conductor's commentary. Recorded on 11/2/2018.
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