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Computers are becoming an increasingly cheaper, more powerful tool that cannot be ignored by professionals. Computer simulation reproduces the behavior of natural and man-made systems to help us understand, predict, and communicate. Vic Castillo, a research engineer at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, shows how computer simulation is used by LLNL scientists on the world's fastest computers. See how you can get started doing your own computer simulations with free, open-source tools for class projects or just for fun.

The age of origin of the Homo lineage is thought to have fallen between 2.5 and 3.0 mya. However, William Kimbel (Arizona State Univ) argues in this talk that recent fossil and stone tool discoveries call for a new evaluation of factors involved in the origin and the early evolution of Homo. Recorded on 02/05/2016.

From the medicines that we take in the morning, to the plastic chairs that we sit on during afternoon class, we are constantly interacting with structurally complex organic molecules. Keary Engle provides a thorough overview of the chemical synthesis process and will discuss how inefficiencies in chemical synthesis provide opportunities for creative innovation. Recorded on 01/28/2017.

Robotics are increasingly becoming part of our lives, providing diverse benefits. However, that same technology captures information about us. This raises intriguing questions about whether that information should be stored, with whom and when it should be shared, and if it should be shared at all. Albert ("Al") P. Pisano, Professor and Dean, UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, explains how engineers are working to not only answers these questions but create solutions that improve our quality of life.

In this candid and heartwarming interview, Tam O'Shaughnessy, the life partner of the late astronaut Sally Ride, describes her long relationship with the first American woman in space. From their days on the teen tennis circuit in California through Sally's historic flights on the Space Shuttle Challenger to their parallel academic careers and later, founding their own company, Tam tells how their deep friendship blossomed over time into a romance that ended with Sally's death from cancer in 2012. As the Executive Director of Sally Ride Science@UC San Diego, Tam continues to inspire girls to embrace STEM, and shares her profound pride as the sponsor of the newly commissioned R/V Sally Ride, the first Naval academic research vessel ever named for a woman, now operated by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

David Valentine highlights recent ocean exploration activities undertaken by UCSB faculty, staff and students. Many scientific discoveries are enabled through the combined use of manned submarines, remote controlled, and fully autonomous underwater vehicles. The discoveries themselves range from bizarre viruses to waste dump sites to geologic features and highlight the power of exploration for discovery. Recorded on 07/05/2016.

Find out about both synthetic and molecular biology approaches to produce small nano-machines (nano-bots). The main building blocks for these nano-bots are based on nano-lipo-protein particles (NLPs). Nano-bots represent a unique solution for new approaches to vaccines, drug delivery and energy needs. Recorded on 02/25/2017.

Skin is the primary interface between ourselves and our environment. Nina Jablonski, Pennsylvania State University, looks at what makes our skin unique and, perhaps, more important than we realize. Recorded on 02/28/2017.

Blending climate science with economic modeling, Emilie Mazzacurati offers clients strategic advice on how to protect local communities by integrating climate risk into business decisions. Mazzacurati, an alumna of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, talks with fellow alumnus Jonathan Stein how she founded her company, Four Twenty Seven Climate Solutions, to build climate resilience through social innovation.

With the US's commitment to the Paris Agreement in question and the future of federal climate change policy unclear, what steps should California take to remain at the forefront of climate action policy? UC Berkeley's Meredith Fowlie, Sol Hsiang, and Carol Zabin join in a discussion moderated by Center for Environmental Public Policy Executive Director Ned Helme about California's policy options given potential conflicts with the Trump administration on issues of climate change and the environment. This presentation was part of Cal Day 2017, sponsored by the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Recorded on 04/22/2017.

In his role as a Scripps Oceanography shark research biologist, Daniel Cartamil has traveled the Pacific coast of Baja California for over a decade. He discovered a fragile paradise of remote landscapes, wildlife, and cultural treasures, on the verge of being overtaken by modern civilization. Science and art converge as we take a photographic journey through western Baja California illustrated with breathtaking photography from Cartamil's new book, "Baja's Wild Side." Recorded on 07/11/2017.

The human mind is one of the features that makes our species unusual, and any narrative of our origins must include explanations for how our mental facilities were generated by genetic and cultural evolutionary processes. Comparative studies with the minds of other species and direct studies of how the typical human brain creates the mind are valuable approaches. However, many useful clues can also be gleaned from studying extraordinary variations of the human mind. This Symposium brings together experts who have pursued in-depth explorations of some of these variations. Recorded on 05/05/2017.

The documentary In Utero explores how experiences in utero affect our lives. Director Kathleen Man Gyllenhaal and Producer Stephen Gyllenhaal are be joined by Professor Brenda Major (Psychological and Brain Sciences, UCSB) and Professor Maya Rossin-Slater (Economics, UCSB) for a discussion moderated by Professor Maryam Kia-Keating (Counseling, Clinical, & School Psychology, UCSB). Recorded on 04/27/2017.

The United Kingdom is preparing to leave the European Union. The effects of that move on science in Britain can be gauged using the example of Coventry. Its university has many students from Europe and many research projects with EU funding.
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