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The second of two lectures on weed identification techniques and some methods of control. Here, Joseph M. DiTomaso, UC Cooperative Extension Non-Crop Weed Ecologist, addresses UC Master Gardener students about weed identification and various weed control methods. Topics include yellow star thistle, mowing, burning, and the use of chemicals. Presented as part of the UC Master Gardener Lecture Series.

NASA's NuSTAR spacecraft, launched in June of 2012, uses technology developed in part by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to take pictures of the sky in the most energetic X-rays ever to be focused. Bill Craig and Michael Pivovaroff talk about the innovative technology at the heart of NuSTAR and discuss some of the exciting science results from the first few months of NuSTAR's mission. Recorded on 02/02/2013.

Crustaceans, with their hard, protective outer skeleton and highly specialized limbs, are truly evolutionary wonders. Join Scripps Oceanography marine biologist Jennifer Taylor as she describes her research on crustacean biomechanics and tells us how 500 million years of evolution has shaped crustaceans into the remarkable array of animals we see on Earth today.

Can stem cells be a weapon in the fight against Alzheimer's disease? Larry Goldstein, PhD director the the UC San Diego Stem Cell Program, joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to discuss how stem cells work and what possibilities they may unlock.

Calit Research Scientist and National Geographic Explorer Albert Lin, renowned for his hi-tech search for the tomb of Genghis Khan hosts Ryan Kastner, co-director of UC San Diego's Engineers for Exploration Program in a discussion of the ways computer engineering and computer science are integral to many fields like archaeology that one would never imagine.

STEAM requires partnership and input from varied perspectives. Laura Kohn of the Education Synergy Alliance calls on leaders in industry, education, and arts to share their experiences in building support for STEAM. Ed Hidalgo of Qualcomm, Suzette Lovely of the Carlsbad Unified School District, Roman Del Rosario of the Sweetwater Union High School District, Ed Abeyta of UC San Diego Extension and Dalouge Smith of the San Diego Youth Symphony discuss their work with Kohn at the 2015 STEAMConnect Ascend Conference. Recorded on 03/05/2015.

Climate scientist Richard Somerville completes the "Climate Change at the Crossroads" series presented by the UC San Diego Library with a talk recounting his experiences at the Paris COP 21 conference and his ongoing efforts to widen public understanding of the catastrophic impacts of climate change.

The Scripps Research Institute's Dennis Wolan takes you on a fascinating exploration of the human body's ecosystem and the myriad symbiotic relations found there that sustain and affect everything from immunity to behavior, and how his lab "mines" this microbiome for potential therapies.

Mobile devices are an integral part of our daily lives. But with their growing functionality and capability comes increased risk to personal privacy and security. At a fundamental level, mobile devices are incredibly hard to secure. Ben Zhao, Professor of Computer Science at UC Santa Barbara, discusses some of the fundamental security and privacy risks in mobile device and recent work in identifying and addressing the problem of "Sybil Devices," software code that pass themselves as mobile devices to manipulate and attack mobile apps from within. Recorded on 07/12/2016.

Harvard University's Beth Stevens reveals how understanding the role of immune cells in neural development may lead to better understanding and treatment of neurological impairments such as schizophrenia. Recorded on 12/02/2016.

2016 was a good and bad year for efforts to tackle climate change. The good news is that 120 parties have ratified the Paris Convention; the bad news is the emergence of post-truth politics and the associated denial of the evidence that climate change is a threat to our future. Leading environmentalist and Member of UK House of Lords John Krebs discusses the trends and their implications for global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Recorded on 01/25/2017.

Joseph LeDoux explores the physiological distinctions between human response to fear and anxiety and how that can inform our understanding of behaviors and concepts associated with death and mortality; Colin Renfrew explores representations of death and immortality across time and cultures as a lens with which we can understand different cultural responses to mortality and Rita Astuti examines rituals surrounding death as ways to unite communities and affirm kinship and identity within societies. Recorded on 03/03/2017.

Ajit Varki explores the human capacity for denial of reality and how that has shaped our evolution; Sheldon Solomon different philosophies surrounding mortality; and Nicholas Humphrey provides a comprehensive look at the motivations for, prevalence of and reactions to the uniquely human act for suicide. Recorded on 03/03/2017.

A vast majority of the newly discovered human pathogens are viruses that have jumped to humans from an animal host ("cross-species transmission"). Find out how biologists and computer scientists have collaborated and used cutting edge ultra-deep sequencing technology to study the dynamics of a 2009 rabies outbreak to better understand emergent viruses, such as Ebola and Zika.

High tech on the farm / Vitamins and aging? / Bodies in motion / Smells and cells / Titel: How is it possible to navigate in space?

Blending climate science with economic modeling, Emilie Mazzacurati offers clients strategic advice on how to protect local communities by integrating climate risk into business decisions. Mazzacurati, an alumna of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, talks with fellow alumnus Jonathan Stein how she founded her company, Four Twenty Seven Climate Solutions, to build climate resilience through social innovation.

Treating depression can be a slow process. Even after pinpointing the correct medication, it can still take weeks to take effect. Abraham A. Palmer, PhD, Professor and Vice Chair for Basic Research in the Department of Psychiatry at UC San Diego joins our host Dr. David Granet to discuss his work uncovering of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of depression. Dr. Palmer and his team are exploring how inhibiting the Glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) enzyme can reduce signs of depression. He explains the science behind the discovery and the implications for new, faster-acting treatments.
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