Health and Medicine


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Sandra Encalada describes her work that interfaces the fields of cell biology, genetics and biochemistry in understanding the role of cellular motor-based transport in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

In his new book, Spitting in the Soup: Inside the Dirty Game of Doping in Sports, UC San Diego alumnus and sports journalist Mark Johnson traces the doping culture in professional sports, from the early days when pills meant progress, to the current day, when athletes are vilified for the use of performance-enhancing drugs. In his book, Johnson, who has covered cycling as a writer and photographer since the 1980s, explores the complex relationships that underlie elite sports culture.

Todd P. Coleman of the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering discusses multi-disciplinary efforts to develop noninvasive tools to monitor health status. He shares novel ways of interpreting the collected data for prediction, diagnosis, and prevention of disease, with a particular focus on chronic disease management and healthy aging, as well as the ethics of data collection, privacy, and assessment methods.

Learn more about risks and benefits of alcohol use in older adults from Dr. Alison Moore, Chief, Division of Geriatrics at UC San Diego School of Medicine. Dr. Moore discusses alcohol-medication interactions, comorbidity issues, current research and more.

The skeleton is remarkably engineered to provide structural support, protect vital parts and facilitate movement. Discover bone biomechanics and how we can leverage the properties of bone to better engineer skeletal repair. Recorded on 02/23/2017.

Robert Hendren, DO. Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, UCSF.

The paradox of today's global food system is that food insecurity or obesity threaten the health and welfare of half the world's population. Underlying these problems is an overabundant and overly competitive food system in which companies are forced to expand market channels to meet corporate growth targets. The contradiction between the goals of public health and food corporations has led to a large and growing food movement in the United States, which seeks policy changes to promote healthier and more environmentally sound food choices. Marion Nestle considers the cultural, economic, and institutional factors that influence food policies and choices, and the balance between individual and societal responsibility for those choices. Recorded on 03/21/2017.

Jeffrey P. Harris, MD, PhD, FACS joins William Mobley, MD, PhD for a wide-ranging discussion about the field of otolaryngology. With his background in immunology, Dr. Harris has pioneered new methods of drug delivery to the inner ear. As a surgeon, he did the first cochlear implant surgery in San Diego county and continues to work with the technology as it advances. He discusses current treatments for inner ear problems and looks to the future - including treatments for HPV-related facial cancers, regenerating hair cells in cases of hearing loss, the brain's response to cochlear implants and more.

Home remedies to fight coughing/  How to fight a cough / How dangerous is whooping cough? / Trauma therapy to reduce pain / Can salt make you sick?

As an advocate for the California hospitals that provide the core of the state's healthcare safety net, Jackie Bender is on high alert over calls to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. She talks here with Jonathan Stein about how GOP plans in Congress would affect the millions of patients who now depend on the medical centers she represents as the Vice President of Policy for California Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems. Bender and Stein are both alumni of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Recorded on 03/28/2017.

Drawing on her own experience growing up in the caste system in India, Sudha Shetty channels her compassion for others into research and advocacy for victims of domestic violence and child abduction. As she describes here in a conversation with Henry E. Brady, dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, Shetty has helped judges and others in the legal community protect women and children from the unintended consequences of poorly drafted policies.

Gary M. Rothenberg, DPM, CDE, CWS. Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan School of Medicine. Recorded on 04/08/2017.

Joseph L. Mills, Sr., MD. Professor and Chief Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine. Vincent L. Rowe, MD, FACS. Professor of Surgery Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California. Recorded on 04/08/2017.

A single tumor cell can contain thousands of genetic mutations, some of which provide critical information about the precise cancer type and provide clues about which therapy may be effective. Hear how genome-based analysis is improving diagnosis and treatment.

In the US, more than 15,000 people are waiting for a liver donation. In California, one in four listed for liver transplant will die before an organ becomes available. What is causing this shortage of liver donations and what is being done to help? Alan W. Hemming, MD, MSc, FRCSC, FACS, discusses the innovative technique of living donor transplants that is changing the odds for many patients.
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