Health and Medicine


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Choosing residential care for a loved one if often a difficult decision. Linda Cho, executive director of Stellar care, joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to talk about the new models of residential care, family involvement, care with dignity and more.

Not since 1965 has there been a more significant overhaul of the American healthcare system. With the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act comes a reshaping of the industry. As a result of these major changes, new opportunities emerge opportunities to contribute in a meaningful field that is expanding quickly. Hear from industry experts and accomplished instructors who will help us understand the latest trends, identify the most promising fields, and pursue new career pathways. Recorded on 09/10/2015.

Helping patients and their families while conducting research to better understand and treat the disease are the goals of UC San Diego's Huntington's program. Dr. Jody Corey-Bloom explains.

The popular over-the-counter medication, acetaminophen, is generally used to reduce fever and pain. However, a growing body of research suggests that the drug has broader psychological effects. Experimental social psychologist Kyle Ratner discusses his research examining the effects of acetaminophen on social group biases in person perception. Recorded on 07/07/2016.

Phyllis Ferrell, Vice President and Global Development Leader for Alzheimer's Disease at Eli Lilly and Company joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to talk about the goal set forth in the National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease to "prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer's disease by 2025." Ferrell's shares her work to make Alzheimer's dementia preventable by finding ways to slow disease progression and advocating for early diagnosis. Recorded on 12/8/2016.

"Diplomacy" and "ethics" are words that describe complex interactions that are aspects of nation-to-nation relationships like that of the US and Mexico as well as other countries. Technology and the sciences play into this complexity as tools. By showing how solutions can be achieved and acting as teaching and mentoring examples for students and First Responders, we can help nurture real solutions forward even during times of conflict rhetoric and natural disasters. Actually seeking to help in diplomacy with preparing for and responding to natural disasters like earthquakes, fires, floods, hurricanes, tsunamis, drought, and disease can build remarkable friendships and shared dependence and resilience. Eric G. Frost, Director of the Viz Center and Homeland Security Graduate Program at San Diego State University, shares examples of how this is being done and how it might be applied to current global challenges and opportunities.

Dr. Peter Pronovost, Sr. Vice President for Patient Safety and Quality, Director of the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Learn about creatures that can bite, sting and release a toxin. Emergency medicine doctor Daniel Repplinger talks about the clinical presentation and treatment for run-ins with snakes, spiders and scorpions native to the US. Recorded on 03/29/2017.

Medical oncologist Daniel Vicario, co-founder of the San Diego Cancer Center, talks about his pioneering research in integrating Western medicine with ancient healing techniques as he develops comprehensive treatment plans for his patients. In this conversation with Paul J. Mills of UC San Diego, Dr. Vicario gives examples of treatments that have led to a decrease in symptoms, fewer doctor visits and a higher quality of life for those who are responsive to holistic cancer care. Recorded on 03/22/2017.

Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Marion Nestle, Goddard Professor in the Department of Nutrition at New York University. Professor Nestle reflects on the evolution of her thinking on the interplay between nutrition studies and the politics of food. She discusses the environment of the food industry producing in a highly competitive environment where profits are paramount and public health is not a priority. Advertising and lobbying are important tools at their service as they confront food activists focused on public health, environment, and social justice. Professor Nestle also analyzes the role of government in choosing between re-enforcing the status quo or changing the landscape of food production through funding, regulation, and education. Finally, she offers advice to students preparing for the future. Recorded on 03/22/2017.

The paradox of today's global food system is that food insecurity or obesity threaten the health and welfare of half the world's population. Underlying these problems is an overabundant and overly competitive food system in which companies are forced to expand market channels to meet corporate growth targets. The contradiction between the goals of public health and food corporations has led to a large and growing food movement in the United States, which seeks policy changes to promote healthier and more environmentally sound food choices. Marion Nestle considers the cultural, economic, and institutional factors that influence food policies and choices, and the balance between individual and societal responsibility for those choices. Recorded on 03/21/2017.

As an advocate for the California hospitals that provide the core of the state's healthcare safety net, Jackie Bender is on high alert over calls to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. She talks here with Jonathan Stein about how GOP plans in Congress would affect the millions of patients who now depend on the medical centers she represents as the Vice President of Policy for California Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems. Bender and Stein are both alumni of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Recorded on 03/28/2017.

Drawing on her own experience growing up in the caste system in India, Sudha Shetty channels her compassion for others into research and advocacy for victims of domestic violence and child abduction. As she describes here in a conversation with Henry E. Brady, dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, Shetty has helped judges and others in the legal community protect women and children from the unintended consequences of poorly drafted policies.

Warren Gasper, MD. Assistant Professor of Surgery, Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, UCSF. Recorded on 04/07/2017.

Daniel Cooke, MD. Assistant Professor of Radiology, UCSF. Recorded on 04/07/2017.

Wade Smith, MD, PhD. Professor of Neurology, UCSF. Recorded on 04/07/2017.

The body's immune system, long thought to be ineffective in combatting established tumors, is being harnessed by new drugs to better identify and kill tumor cells. Learn how immunotherapy research is leading to more precise treatments based on individual biology, tumors, and immune system response, and revealing which immunotherapies will be most effective.

Treating depression can be a slow process. Even after pinpointing the correct medication, it can still take weeks to take effect. Abraham A. Palmer, PhD, Professor and Vice Chair for Basic Research in the Department of Psychiatry at UC San Diego joins our host Dr. David Granet to discuss his work uncovering of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of depression. Dr. Palmer and his team are exploring how inhibiting the Glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) enzyme can reduce signs of depression. He explains the science behind the discovery and the implications for new, faster-acting treatments.

In the US, more than 15,000 people are waiting for a liver donation. In California, one in four listed for liver transplant will die before an organ becomes available. What is causing this shortage of liver donations and what is being done to help? Alan W. Hemming, MD, MSc, FRCSC, FACS, discusses the innovative technique of living donor transplants that is changing the odds for many patients.

Pelvic floor dysfunction physical therapists provide tips for maintaining pelvic health to stay continent and pain-free. Recorded on 05/23/2017.

Orthopedic clinical specialist Wendy Katzman looks at avoiding fractures in older age with a focus on skeletal health. Recorded on 05/30/2017.

If you are hiking, skiing, climbing or just visiting at altitude higher than 8,000 feet you may experience altitude sickness. Emergency Medicine specialist Dr. Chris Colwell covers the symptoms and what you should do if you show any of the signs. Recorded on 04/26/2017.

If joints wear out and start causing pain, they are frequently replaced with artificial joints. DW visits a certified center for joint replacement and talks about what we can expect from artificial implants. We also look at how plasma pencils could be the next big thing, and how boxing is being used as a treatment for anxiety.

A broken bone in the wilderness may require splinting and evacuation. Find out how to create a temporary splint to immobilize the affected area and then evacuate the patient with emergency medicine expert Dr. Louis Yu.
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