Health and Medicine


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Deborah Kado, MD, MS discusses common spine conditions such as osteoporosis and the related disorder, hyperkyphosis, and recent advances in treatment. Recorded on 10/16/2013.

Dr. Lisa Stellwagen, clinical professor of pediatrics and medical director of Newborn Services at UC San Diego, joins Dr. David Granet to discuss the information all new parents need before bringing an infant home from the hospital. Learn the basics of safe sleeping, breast-feeding, newborn vaccinations and health screenings, as well as how and when to choose a pediatrician.

Known as "the man who would cure the world," Paul Farmer works to provide first world health care for third world peoples and co-founded the worldwide organization Partners in Health. Author of "To Repair the World" and "Pathologies of Power Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor," Farmer was also the subject of Tracy Kidder's "Mountains Beyond Mountains." Dr. Farmer talks here with Dean Nelson, founder of the Writer's Symposium by the Sea at Point Loma Nazarene University. Recorded on 04/09/2014.

Cancer is a lens in which to understand modern society and the acquisition of knowledge, argues Pulitzer-Prize winning author and oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee. In this wide-ranging interview with journalist Dean Nelson, Dr. Mukherjee goes on to describe himself as a "sober optimist" about the future of cancer research as he urges the cancer community to demand more public support for cancer therapies, treatments and prevention. He was presented as part of the Exploring Ethics series convened around his best-selling book, "The Emperor of all Maladies: A Biography of Cancer" by the Center for Ethics in Science and Technology and the Helen Edison Lecture Series at UC San Diego Extension.

Millions have watched Dr. Robert Lustig's YouTube videos on the role sugar plays in obesity. In this compilation of the popular YouTube series "The Skinny on Obesity," Dr. Lustig and his UCSF colleagues dig deeper into the root causes of the obesity epidemic. Discover why what we eat is as important as how much we eat. Understand the effects of stress on obesity rates, and why some predict that the next generation will die younger than the current one due to obesity and the many health problems it causes.

Falls are a threat to the health and independence of older adults potentially limiting their self-sufficiency. Dr. Louise Aronson, Associate Professor of Geriatrics, University of California San Francisco, explores how to try to prevent falls in older adults, and promote safety, health and independence.

The panelists discuss their global clinical investigation programs, highlighting creative research approaches and lessons learned. Topics include innovative methods for studying treatment of tuberculosis, infectious and inflammatory eye diseases, and mental health disorders in resource-constrained environments around the world. Each speaker provides case examples, discusses achievements, and shares his or her perspectives on opportunities for furthering UCSF global clinical research initiatives. Panelists: Nisha Acharya, Associate Professor, Departments of Ophthalmology and Epidemiology; Susan Meffert, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry; Payam Nahid, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine. Saam Morshed, Assistant Professor, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery moderates.

Three global health experts - Gregg Alton JD, Executive Vice President, Gilead; Ambassador Eric Goosby MD: Global Health Science, UCSF; and Stefano Bertozzi MD PhD, Dean, School of Public Health, UC Berkeley - discuss the role and responsibilities of public and private organizations in the response to the global HIV and HCV epidemics. From policy advances to facilitate access to life saving antiretrovirals for millions of patients, to challenges in regulatory infrastructure, to the rocky path for point-of-care diagnostics and treatment monitoring technologies, to the recognition that treatment is prevention and key to any containment strategy - the lessons provided by the expansion and entrenchment of the HIV epidemic, and successes and failures in the public health response are unparalleled in the global health arena.

Dr. Christopher D. Owens, Associate Professor of Surgery and Endovascular Surgery University of California San Francisco. Recorded on 04/03/2014.

Shant M. Vartanian, MD, Assistant Professor of Surgery, Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, UCSF. Recorded on 04/03/2014.

Steven Hetts, MD, and Christopher F. Dowd, MD, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, UCSF. Recorded on 04/04/2014.

A look at current research and practices in kidney transplantation at UC San Francisco.

Genomic monitoring of transplant patients.

Historically, neurosurgeons have had little information available to help navigate through the brain during surgery. New technologies are now allowing them to design more direct trajectories to brain tumors as well safely remove more of the tumor minimizing damage to healthy brain tissue. Dr. Clark Chen joins Dr. David Granet to explain how tractography and performing surgery in the MRI are improving patient outcomes.

Preeclampsia is a disorder of the placenta that complicates 5-8% of all pregnancies worldwide and is the leading cause of maternal death in the developed world. It's also the leading cause of fetal growth restriction and there's no cure except to deliver the baby. Due to this fact preeclampsia is the number one cause of induced preterm delivery in the U.S. Babies that survive often spend months in neonatal intensive care and have many complications and increase risk for heart disease and diabetes later in life. In this video CIRM grantee Dr. Mana Parast, a UCSD perinatal pathologist, discusses her use of the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technique to screen for drugs that might lead to a cure for preeclampsia.Also, Silvia Michelazzi, a preeclampsia survivor, and her husband Dr. Matteo Moretto-Zito share their daughter's birth story.

One third of premature deaths in the U.S. are attributable to poor nutrition and physical inactivity. Dr. Robert Baron, UCSF Professor of Medicine, explains the costs of poor nutrition and what you can do to improve your diet. The healthiest diet limit sugars, refined grains, and large amounts of saturated and trans fat. He advises to eat fruits and vegetables, healthy oils, whole grains, legumes and nuts. Recorded on 05/30/2014.

UCSF nutritionist Katie Ferraro explains a healthy person on 2,000 calorie diet per day should strive for 65 grams total fat, less than 20 grams saturated fat, zero grams trans fat and under 200 milligrams of dietary cholesterol. Learn more about each type of fat and how to identify which is in what food. Recorded on 05/30/2014.
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