Arts and Music


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Mexican folkloric dance is a stylized, choreographed art form designed to display the cultural diversity of Mexico with energy, heart, and intricate technique. Rooted in the post-revolutionary period, folkloric dance blossomed in the 1960s, becoming a thriving phenomenon in Mexico and the United States, and is now performed all over the world. Produced and directed by Olga Najera-Ramirez, a professor of Anthropology at UC Santa Cruz, this film traces the history of folkloric dance through the life and artistic productions of the internationally acclaimed artist, dancer and choreographer, Rafael Zamarripa, a former member of the Ballet Folklórico de Mexico.

"Water Passion" is a multicultural/multimedia oratorio, written by acclaimed Chinese composer Tan Dun to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the birth of J.S. Bach, whose "St. Matthew Passion" provided the initial inspiration for this work. The music is a theatrical mix of water bowls, drums, strings, Tibetan bells, chants, digital sounds, Chinese opera and Tuvan throat singing, with a dash of jazz and postmodernism, all filtered through Tan Dun's adventurous sensibility.

The essence of the classical form resides in the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Johannes Brahms, as interpreted in this concert by a gathering of renowned musicians at the La Jolla Music Society 2014 SummerFest.

A stellar roster of performers present the music of Franz Joseph Haydn, a seminal figure in the development of classical form and an inspiration to Mozart, Beethoven and many other composers who followed.

After working in relative obscurity during his lifetime, forty years after his untimely death Franz Schubert was recognized as one of the colossal creative forces in music. In this presentation a distinguished group of musicians performs Schubert's "String Quintet in C Major," one of the greatest achievements in the chamber music form.

Brahms composed the Trio in E-flat Major in 1865 to commemorate the death of his mother, Christiane, earlier that year. The four movements of the piece represent the stages of mourning, alternating sombre and lively lively and ending on a note of hope for the future. Recorded on 8/16/2014.

Haydn's clarinet trios were probably intended to be performed by friends at home for their own pleasure, rather than as concert works for professional musicians. They are music meant to be enjoyed by both musicians and audience in a relaxed setting. Recorded on 8/19/2014.

The baryton is an obsolete stringed instrument of the viol family, played during the 17th and 18th centuries. Haydn composed 126 trios for the instrument, to be played by his patron, Prince Nikolaus Esterházy. Recorded on 8/19/2014.

Actress Diane Ladd discusses her Academy Award-nominated performance as the comical, independent and vulgar Flo in Martin Scorsese's Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore. This film was Scorsese's first Hollywood studio production and marked his first (and only) attempt at a female-centered story.

Visual Artist Sheldon Brown presents a multimedia tour de force exploring how art and science illuminate the freedom of imagination. Using examples from his extensive body of work, the founding director of the Arthur C. Clarke Center for the Human Imagination challenges this audience to think about how developments in computation have reframed our understanding of the world and how new digital methods are affecting the means and modes of culture. Brown's talk is the final installment of the "Degrees of Freedom" lecture series presented by the Division of Arts and Humanities at UC San Diego.

E. Randol Schoenberg, the grandson of the composer Arnold Schoenberg, is an expert in handling cases involving looted art and the recovery of property stolen by the Nazi authorities during the Holocaust. He tells the story here of his most prominent case, "Republic of Austria v. Altmann" which resulted in the successful return of six paintings by Gustav Klimt, including the "Golden Lady," to their rightful owners. Recorded on 05/06/2015.

Jazz made its path abroad in 1918 during the "Great War" when one black officer, Lt. James Reese Europe, volunteered for service with members of his Harlem Society Orchestra, forming the 369th Regimental Band. Because the U.S. Army did not allow black soldiers to fight alongside white comrades, the soldiers instead fought with the French and earned the moniker "Hellfighters," along with the Croix de Guerre for their heroism. The Harlem Hellfighters also brought jazz with them, and from Paris the music spread around the globe, becoming the rhythm of the 20th century. The 19th Annual Lytle Benefit Concert pays homage to the Harlem Hellfighters' enduring legacy and raises scholarship funds for promising students attending the Preuss School at UC San Diego.

UC San Diego's annual Jazz Camp gathers students and professionals together for a week-long, immersion in the art and culture of jazz. The program culminates in a finale concert, performed by student ensembles under the guidance of distinguished faculty members. The students perform both new compositions and established standards. Recorded on 6/26/2015.

Q&A with the director and one of the participants of the 2014 documentary, Occupy the Farm. The film documents the plight of 200 urban farmers as they occupy a publicly owned research farm and plant it with two acres of crops in order to save the land from becoming a real-estate development. Recorded on 04/14/2015.
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